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Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

 

Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and torturedbefore they died.

Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.  
 
Two lost their
sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.
 
Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the
Revolutionary War.
 
They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
and their sacred honor.
 
What kind of men were they?
 
Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were
merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated, but they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.
 
 
Carter Braxton
of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.
 
 
Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was
forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.
 
  
Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery
, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.
 
  
At the battle of
Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.
 
 
Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.
 
 
John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was
dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished.
 
 
So, take a few
minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.
 
  
Remember: Freedom is Never Free!
 
  
I hope you will show your support by sending this to as
many people as you can, Please!

It's time we get the word out that patriotism is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games.

 

Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

 

Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and torturedbefore they died.

Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.  
 
Two lost their
sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.
 
Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the
Revolutionary War.
 
They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
and their sacred honor.
 
What kind of men were they?
 
Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were
merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated, but they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.
 
 
Carter Braxton
of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.
 
 
Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was
forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.
 
  
Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery
, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.
 
  
At the battle of
Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.
 
 
Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.
 
 
John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was
dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished.
 
 
So, take a few
minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.
 
  
Remember: Freedom is Never Free!
 
  
I hope you will show your support by sending this to as
many people as you can, Please!

It's time we get the word out that patriotism is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games.

If there is anything we wish to change in the child, we should first examine it and see whether it is not something that could be better changed in ourselves.
--Carl Jung

Children are smart. Remember how we used to imitate our parents' behavior? We'd dress up like them, mimic their words, even copy their attitudes. We wanted to be just like them because we thought they were the most wonderful people in the world. We can see this happen all around us, younger ones imitating parents, older brothers and sisters, and older friends. It's very flattering.

The problem is that children imitate not just healthy behavior and attitudes, but also sometimes the not-so-healthy. We get very uncomfortable when we look at a younger person misbehaving and see ourselves in that person. Suddenly, we aren't flattered any more.

When we see things we don't like in others, we must first look at ourselves to see if we need changing. This is all we can do--change ourselves. Others may follow our example or they may not, but we can be sure that, when we watch our own behavior, most of what we see of ourselves in others will be flattering.

What change can we make to set a good example today?

Life deals more rigorously with some than others. --Lewis F. Presnall How often we think about a friend, He sure is lucky! And probably just as often we say to ourselves, Why did that happen to me? It's not fair! The truth is, life isn't always fair. We don't all get the same experiences, the same lessons. But we each learn what we need to learn in order to fulfill our destiny. We have to learn to trust. Maybe a bike gets stolen or a friend moves away. It's not easy to accept such things as these, but we must all learn to understand and accept losses in our lives. Perhaps we fail a test. The lesson we learn from this may be to study harder or to consider a different course of study in school. There are always reasons for why things happen, but we don't have to know them.
Life always comes to you in good time. There's no need to rush it, and nothing to be gained by attempting to hold it back. Some things will take longer than you thought they would. Go ahead and get them completed anyway. Some things will arrive sooner than you anticipated. Go ahead and deal with them when they do. Make good and thoughtful use of every moment that comes your way. Peacefully let go of any anxiety or resentment about how little time you have or how much time it takes, and simply give your best as time continues to flow. In good time, you'll get it done. In good time, you'll look back and know without a doubt that you have indeed been moving forward. The day ahead is filled with opportunities for joy and fulfillment. Give yourself completely to each moment as it comes, and in good time you'll fill your world with richness. -- Ralph Marston
Three friends were talking. One blamed herself for an unkind remark someone had made to her. Another blamed himself for not getting work done. The other compared his looks to those of the movie stars and thought he was ugly. The friends each noticed how the other two had put themselves down without being aware of it, and they began to laugh. Then they vowed to be as kind to themselves as they were to each other. Each time they caught themselves being mean to themselves, they imagined they were their own best friend, and were as understanding to themselves as they were to one another. When we are kind to ourselves, only then can we be truly kind to others, and make ourselves a gift to those around us. How have I been kind to myself lately?
It's ok to be who you are. It's ok to desire what you desire. In fact, it is more than ok. It is truly wonderful. For in those things that bring you joy, you'll find your greatest opportunities to give to life. In the genuine reality of who you are, you'll discover how to be the best you can be. What means more to you than anything? Honestly explore that question, and you'll connect to a powerful, undeniable purpose. You are a beautiful person with a perspective on life that is uniquely yours. Explore and fulfill the special possibilities that are alive in you. Be who you are and create the unique joys that are yours to give. The beauty of life is what you know it to be. -- Ralph Marston
Let there be spaces in your togetherness. --Kahlil Gibran Sometimes it is just as important to know when to leave others alone as it is to know when to talk with them. We all need to be alone at times--to think, to work out a problem, or just to be quiet with ourselves. This is especially true in families, where we're often surrounded by others. If we tune in to our other family members, we can develop sensors that will let us know when they need some time alone. Part of good communication is knowing when not to talk, too.
Insist on excellence Refuse to accept anything less than excellence from yourself. You know that you're capable of the very best, so make sure you fulfill your greatest possibilities. Hold yourself accountable to your highest vision. Support and encourage your own unique greatness. There is so very much value that you have to contribute to life. The sweet taste of true fulfillment comes from giving the best that you have. There will be countless temptations to take shortcuts and to compromise your most treasured principles. But keep in mind that you will gain nothing of real value by doing so. Instead, insist on excellence from yourself in every endeavor. Do what you know is best, and you'll achieve what you long to achieve. -- Ralph Marston
It's not enough to talk to plants, you also have to listen. --David Bergman Plants grow best when we pay attention to them. That means watering, touching them, putting them in places where they will receive good light. They need people around them to notice if they are drooping at the edges or looking particularly happy in the sunlight. The more attention a plant receives, the better it will grow. We need to be noticed in the same way. If we notice a family member or friend is drooping, perhaps we can pay some special attention to him or her. All of us need someone to care about how we are and to truly listen to us. We can share and double someone's happiness by noticing and talking about it also. We help the people around us to grow by listening to their droopy edges as well as their bright days. People need this as much as plants need light and water. How can I help someone grow today?
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