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silent warrior's blog: "HOLIDAYS"

created on 11/01/2006  |  http://fubar.com/holidays/b20023
Here are the family we left behind when we came to the UK. My sister and her husband have just got back from visiting everyone over there, some of these people i havnt seen for over 10 years!, some more than that! Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket My sister with her husband and daughter Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket My dad with Beth and Alice Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket My dad with his new birthday guitar Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket My aunt Karen and her husband Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket Her oldest daughter, my cousin Debbie with Alan Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket second daughter, my cousin Shellye Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket and her son Zack with his girlfriend..i have never met Zack yet! Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket cousin Debbies 3 kids,twins Hannah and Chloe, Hunter and my niece Alice Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket Hunter being Alices coyboy! Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket My cousi8n Melanie with her mom Pracilla Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket Melanie with her son Kristopher and Alice Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket Denver from Buffalo Bills Grave Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket Alice caught the coyboy bug!!
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Happy Valentines day to you all....and a big smoocheroooo from me!! Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Hope you all have an awesome day......how bout telling someone that you Love them today...someone you dont Usually say that too...or give someone a big hug....or pay them a compliment out of the blue as you pass them in the corridor or in the street, or sitting on the bus....something like.."wow, you look great today"....or..."thats a great job"....or...."you have a wonderful smile"......you will brighten their day and put a smile on their face and in turn you will feel great too......try it an see!!! Mucho Lovo Beci xoxox Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

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AND 2007 IS THE YEAR OF THE PIG.... Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting ..ALTHOUGH THESE LITTLE PIGS SEEM TO BE IN A SPOT OF BOTHER HEHE! HOPE YOU ALL HAVE AN AWESOME NEW YEAR.... always remember for 2007..life is short,break the rules, forgive quickly,kiss slowly,love truely,laugh uncontrolably and NEVER regret anything that made you smile :-) send to all the people you love and care for and dont want to lose in 2007, even me..HAPPY NEW YEAR! xox Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
The song, "Auld Lang Syne," playing in the background, is sung at the stroke of midnight in almost every English-speaking country in the world to bring in the new year. At least partially written by Robert Burns in the 1700's, it was first published in 1796 after Burns' death. Early variations of the song were sung prior to 1700 and inspired Burns to produce the modern rendition. An old Scotch tune, "Auld Lang Syne" literally means "old long ago," or simply, "the good old days." Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Auld Lang Syne Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind? Should auld acquaintance be forgot and days of auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, for auld lang syne, we'll take a cup of kindness yet, for auld lang syne. Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind? Should auld acquaintance be forgot and days of auld lang syne? And here's a hand, my trusty friend And gie's a hand o' thine We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet For auld lang syne Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
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...but for what reason? "Happy New Year!" That greeting will be said and heard for at least the first couple of weeks as a new year gets under way. But the day celebrated as New Year's Day in modern America was not always January 1. Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting ANCIENT NEW YEARS The celebration of the new year is the oldest of all holidays. It was first observed in ancient Babylon about 4000 years ago. In the years around 2000 BC, the Babylonian New Year began with the first New Moon (actually the first visible cresent) after the Vernal Equinox (first day of spring). The beginning of spring is a logical time to start a new year. After all, it is the season of rebirth, of planting new crops, and of blossoming. January 1, on the other hand, has no astronomical nor agricultural significance. It is purely arbitrary. Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting The Babylonian new year celebration lasted for eleven days. Each day had its own particular mode of celebration, but it is safe to say that modern New Year's Eve festivities pale in comparison. The Romans continued to observe the new year in late March, but their calendar was continually tampered with by various emperors so that the calendar soon became out of synchronization with the sun. In order to set the calendar right, the Roman senate, in 153 BC, declared January 1 to be the beginning of the new year. But tampering continued until Julius Caesar, in 46 BC, established what has come to be known as the Julian Calendar. It again established January 1 as the new year. But in order to synchronize the calendar with the sun, Caesar had to let the previous year drag on for 445 days. THE CHURCH'S VIEW OF NEW YEAR CELEBRATIONS Although in the first centuries AD the Romans continued celebrating the new year, the early Catholic Church condemned the festivities as paganism. But as Christianity became more widespread, the early church began having its own religious observances concurrently with many of the pagan celebrations, and New Year's Day was no different. New Years is still observed as the Feast of Christ's Circumcision by some denominations. Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting During the Middle Ages, the Church remained opposed to celebrating New Years. January 1 has been celebrated as a holiday by Western nations for only about the past 400 years. NEW YEAR TRADITIONS Other traditions of the season include the making of New Year's resolutions. That tradition also dates back to the early Babylonians. Popular modern resolutions might include the promise to lose weight or quit smoking. The early Babylonian's most popular resolution was to return borrowed farm equipment. Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting The Tournament of Roses Parade dates back to 1886. In that year, members of the Valley Hunt Club decorated their carriages with flowers. It celebrated the ripening of the orange crop in California. Although the Rose Bowl football game was first played as a part of the Tournament of Roses in 1902, it was replaced by Roman chariot races the following year. In 1916, the football game returned as the sports centerpiece of the festival. The tradition of using a baby to signify the new year was begun in Greece around 600 BC. It was their tradition at that time to celebrate their god of wine, Dionysus, by parading a baby in a basket, representing the annual rebirth of that god as the spirit of fertility. Early Egyptians also used a baby as a symbol of rebirth. Although the early Christians denounced the practice as pagan, the popularity of the baby as a symbol of rebirth forced the Church to reevaluate its position. The Church finally allowed its members to celebrate the new year with a baby, which was to symbolize the birth of the baby Jesus. The use of an image of a baby with a New Years banner as a symbolic representation of the new year was brought to early America by the Germans. They had used the effigy since the fourteenth century. FOR LUCK IN THE NEW YEAR Traditionally, it was thought that one could affect the luck they would have throughout the coming year by what they did or ate on the first day of the year. For that reason, it has become common for folks to celebrate the first few minutes of a brand new year in the company of family and friends. Parties often last into the middle of the night after the ringing in of a new year. It was once believed that the first visitor on New Year's Day would bring either good luck or bad luck the rest of the year. It was particularly lucky if that visitor happened to be a tall dark-haired man. Traditional New Year foods are also thought to bring luck. Many cultures believe that anything in the shape of a ring is good luck, because it symbolizes "coming full circle," completing a year's cycle. For that reason, the Dutch believe that eating donuts on New Year's Day will bring good fortune. Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Many parts of the U.S. celebrate the new year by consuming black-eyed peas. These legumes are typically accompanied by either hog jowls or ham. Black-eyed peas and other legumes have been considered good luck in many cultures. The hog, and thus its meat, is considered lucky because it symbolizes prosperity. Cabbage is another "good luck" vegetable that is consumed on New Year's Day by many. Cabbage leaves are also considered a sign of prosperity, being representative of paper currency. In some regions, rice is a lucky food that is eaten on New Year's Day. Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting AULD LANG SYNE The song, "Auld Lang Syne," playing in the background, is sung at the stroke of midnight in almost every English-speaking country in the world to bring in the new year. At least partially written by Robert Burns in the 1700's, it was first published in 1796 after Burns' death. Early variations of the song were sung prior to 1700 and inspired Burns to produce the modern rendition. An old Scotch tune, "Auld Lang Syne" literally means "old long ago," or simply, "the good old days."
In feudal times, Christmas was a reason for a gathering of extended families. All the serfs would gather their families in the manor of their lord, which made it easier for the lord of the estate to hand out annual stipends to the serfs. After all the Christmas parties on December 26th, the lord of the estate would give practical goods such as cloth, grains, and tools to the serfs who lived on his land. Each family would get a box full of such goods the day after Christmas. Under this explanation, there was nothing voluntary about this transaction; the lord of the manor was obliged to supply these goods. Because of the boxes being given out, the day was called Boxing Day. In Britain many years ago, it was common practice for the servants to carry boxes to their employers when they arrived for their day's work on the day after Christmas. Their employers would then put coins in the boxes as special end-of-year gifts. This can be compared with the modern day concept of Christmas bonuses. The servants carried boxes for the coins, hence the name Boxing Day. In churches, it was traditional to open the church's donation box on Christmas Day, and the money in the donation box was to be distributed to the poorer or lower class citizens on the next day. In this case, the "box" in "Boxing Day" comes from that one gigantic lockbox in which the donations were left. Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

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Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting to all my friends!! well its 7.10 in the morning, i've had about 3 hours sleep an waitin for thekids to wake so thought i'd say have a goood day to all!! Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
The Origin of the Twelve Days of Christmas You're all familiar with the Christmas song, "The Twelve Days of Christmas" I think. To most it's a delightful nonsense rhyme set to music. But it had a quite serious purpose when it was written. It is a good deal more than just a repetitious melody with pretty phrases and a list of strange gifts. Catholics in England during the period 1558 to 1829, when Parliament finally emancipated Catholics in England, were prohibited from ANY practice of their faith by law - private OR public. It was a crime to BE a Catholic. "The Twelve Days of Christmas" was written in England as one of the "catechism songs" to help young Catholics learn the tenets of their faith - a memory aid, when to be caught with anything in *writing* indicating adherence to the Catholic faith could not only get you imprisoned, it could get you hanged, or shortened by a head - or hanged, drawn and quartered, a rather peculiar and ghastly punishment I'm not aware was ever practiced anywhere else. Hanging, drawing and quartering involved hanging a person by the neck until they had almost, but not quite, suffocated to death; then the party was taken down from the gallows, and disembowelled while still alive; and while the entrails were still lying on the street, where the executioners stomped all over them, the victim was tied to four large farm horses, and literally torn into five parts - one to each limb and the remaining torso. The songs gifts are hidden meanings to the teachings of the faith. The "true love" mentioned in the song doesn't refer to an earthly suitor, it refers to God Himself. The "me" who receives the presents refers to every baptized person. The partridge in a pear tree is Jesus Christ, the Son of God. In the song, Christ is symbolically presented as a mother partridge which feigns injury to decoy predators from her helpless nestlings, much in memory of the expression of Christ's sadness over the fate of Jerusalem: "Jerusalem! Jerusalem! How often would I have sheltered thee under my wings, as a hen does her chicks, but thou wouldst not have it so..." The other symbols mean the following: 2 Turtle Doves = The Old and New Testaments 3 French Hens = Faith, Hope and Charity, the Theological Virtues 4 Calling Birds = the Four Gospels and/or the Four Evangelists 5 Golden Rings = The first Five Books of the Old Testament, the "Pentateuch", which gives the history of man's fall from grace. 6 Geese A-laying = the six days of creation 7 Swans A-swimming = the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit, the seven sacraments 8 Maids A-milking = the eight beatitudes 9 Ladies Dancing = the nine Fruits of the Holy Spirit 10 Lords A-leaping = the ten commandments 11 Pipers Piping = the eleven faithful apostles 12 Drummers Drumming = the twelve points of doctrine in the Apostle's Creed Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
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Hi folks...i here to ask a favour...i'm trying to "xmas up" my profile a bit and i wanted Enya's version of Silent Night on here, i found one on youtube, but it doesnt auto play..i have searched for another, found one that SHOULD auto play but isnt working...can anyone help me out pleeeaassse?? *flutters eyelashes* Beci xox Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
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