Over 16,158,123 people are on fubar. What are you waiting for?

So!! Seeing as many ppl moan and canny unnerston ma wurds ur whit am saying hauf eh time when a dj. Here is a little help wi' some auld Scottish wurds and phrases. 

AYE. 
Aye means yes, often replacing the latter in day-to-day life in Scotland. Conversely, ‘aye, right’ is used when expressing feelings of disbelief (think of it as the Scottish equivalent to ‘yeah, right’).


BANTER. 
Thrilling conversation, witty repartee or quips and wisecracks – all in all, just good chat.


BLETHER. 
Catching up, gossiping and talking for extended periods of time would all fall under the umbrella of ‘having a blether’. Best done over a cup of tea or dram of whisky.


BRAW 
Braw is a classic piece of Scottish slang. In the iconic comic strip Oor Wullie, the titular character frequently uses it to describe all things nice, brilliant and fantastic. Someone may have ‘braw banter’, or the view from your hotel room may be braw.

CHANCER. 
A chancer is someone who quite boldly ‘chances their luck’ by taking risks and asking unreasonable requests. This usually comes with an air of cheeky self-awareness. That person who keeps asking to bum a cigarette but never buys them? Chancer.


CHORE. 
To steal, nick or nab. If a person were to chore your stuff, then you can say goodbye to it.


CLIPE. 
A great word to describe someone (particularly a young child) who is always telling on people.
Strangely, it's a Scottish only word that isn't used anywhere else.


DINNAE. 
Don’t. As in: ‘Dinnae forget to pack an umbrella’.


DOOCOT 
Another brilliant word that refers to a slot or pocket for holding paper, as in "the mail goes in that wee doocot over there".Deriving from the word Dovecot, and referring to the small box sections used to hold the roosting birds, it's not used anywhere else.


DREICH. 
It is no lie that Scotland has its fair share of gloomy weather. For the days that are drab and grey, dreich is a just description.


FAE. 
From. You can be fae Edinburgh, fae Glasgow, fae Aberdeen – fae anywhere, really.


FIZZY JUICE /GINGER
Soda, soft drink or carbonated sugar water. Scots would tell you there is no better fizzy juice than an ice-cold can of Irn-Bru.


FOOTERY. 
A footery bit is something that's awkward or tricky, which aptly describes how hard it is to explain to a non-Scot what you are havering on about when you say it.


GET TAE. 
Used to tell someone to go away (sometimes followed by the F-word in particularly heated circumstances). It can also be used sarcastically when someone’s telling lies or exaggerating a story.


HAUD YER WHEESHT. 
Used to tell someone to be quiet or shut up. The hallmark of Scottish motherhood since time immemorial.


JAG. 
Currently widely used in reference to the vaccinations for covid, which are going on up and down the country, jag is a Scottish word for an injection that isn't used in England, with 'jab' being the preferred version south of the border.


KEN. 
To know. As in: ‘A ken Moira fae doon the road’. Conversely, ‘dinnae ken’ means you don’t know.


LADDIE /LASSIE. 
Boy and girl, usually on the younger side. Often said with endearment.


MESSAGES. 
Supermarket or grocery items. Not related to postal workers.


MONY A MICKLE MAKS A MUCKLE. 
This old adage offers shrewd business advice, stating that small amounts of money, when properly invested, eventually grow to pretty sums. Scrooge McDuck would approve. It’s also fun to say out loud.


OUTWITH 

A favourite 'covert Scotticism', outwith is widely used in Scotland and means 'outside, out of, or beyond'.
However, there isn't really an English equivalent leaving us wondering why it's not used outwith Scotland. 


PEELY-WALLY. 
Pale and sickly. It’s also used to tease people with a lack of a suntan.


PIE. 
To outright ignore someone on purpose. People in Scotland generally take offence to being pied – but not to the delicious pastries you can find in their bakeries.


PURE BARRY. 
Utterly wonderful and fantastic. 

 

RADGE. 
Someone who is rambunctious or aggressive. ‘That’s well radge’ is used to describe crazy or unfair situations.

 

RANK. 
Disgusting and vile. Not to be confused with taxi ranks, where people queue up for a ride home.

SCRAN

. Food, dishes or sustenance. Classic Scottish scran includes cullen skink, mince and tatties, and the ever-popular haggis.


SHAN. 
Unfair. For example, if someone were to cut in front of a queue, or if a bacon roll only had half a piece inside. In these circumstances, you are well within your right to describe the injustice with ‘well shan’.

 

 

SKEDADDLE AFF. 
To scurry along your merry way. It can also be used as a way to say ‘leave me alone’.

 

SKELF. 
Getting a small sliver of wood trapped beneath your skin in Scotland would be referred to as a skelf, everywhere else though it would be a splinter.

 

SKITE. 
To go out on the skite means to have a (usually alcohol-fuelled) night out. Some of the most legendary nights on the skite take place in thriving bars, pubs and clubs.

 

SNIB. 
In Scotland, you'll often hear the expression "did you put the snib on?" if you're the last person to leave a house.
Referring to the bolt or fastening of a door or window, snib is another of those Scottish words you probably didn't know was only used in Scotland.

 

STEAMIN. 
Very, very drunk. Synonym: reeking.

 

STOOKIE. 
Though asking someone in Scotland with a broken arm or leg "can I sign your stookie?" is perfectly reasonable.
Asking anywhere else might leave the other person feeling a little confused by your request, as the word 'stookie' for a cast is only used here.

 

TAKING A SHY. 
This expression possibly comes from the popularity of the coconut shy games found at gala days and funfairs around Scotland.Used when playing football, it usually refers to taking a throw in.

 

TIDY. 
The ultimate seal of approval, expressing one’s appreciation for something. As in: ‘That was some tidy scran’.


YER HEID’S FULL O' MINCE. 
It is not ideal to have a heid full o’ mince, as it implies that the words that come out of a person’s mouth are, quite frankly, nonsensical.

Leave a comment!
html comments NOT enabled! comment approval required.
NOTE: If you post content that is offensive, adult, or NSFW (Not Safe For Work), your account will be deleted.[?]

giphy icon
last post
1 month ago
posts
9
views
72
can view
everyone
can comment
everyone
atom/rss

other blogs by this author

 8 months ago
Djing
 9 months ago
Tests
 1 year ago
Poems I wrote
official fubar blogs
 5 years ago
fubar news by babyjesus  
 9 years ago
Scrapper Kustom's Offic... by SCRAPPER  
 12 hrs ago
e by e  
 10 years ago
fubar.com ideas! by babyjesus  
 7 years ago
fubar'd Official Wishli... by SCRAPPER  
 8 years ago
Word of Esix by esixfiddy  

discover blogs on fubar

blog.php' rendered in 0.1584 seconds on machine '211'.